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Best selling authors motivate Twin Cities students, professionals young physicians chronicled their quest for excellence

Thursday, March 27, 2003, the Circle of Power and Respect Group from Crosswinds Junior High, Woodbury, MN, witnessed live examples of educational success. Drs. Sampson Davis MD (ER Physician), George Jenkins DMD, and Rameck Hunt MD (Internist), captivated an audience of junior high to college students at Augsburg College. Thursday, March 27, 2003, the Circle of Power and Respect Group from Crosswinds Junior High, Woodbury, MN, witnessed live examples of educational success. Drs. Sampson Davis MD (ER Physician), George Jenkins DMD, and Rameck Hunt MD (Internist), captivated an audience of junior high to college students at Augsburg College. The Drs. better known as ‘The Pact’ shared their story of trials, tests and triumph. ‘The Pact’ were guest at the Fairview Quality Leadership Health Conference. The Circle of Power and Respect Group is an elective course created for students to build relationships, and express themselves with peers. The class read excerpts of “The Pact: Three Young Men Make A Promise, And Fulfill A Dream,” weeks prior to hearing the Drs. speak.

It all began one sunny day, when three high school juniors skipped class. While en route to the gymnasium, school security called after them. They quickly retreated into the library. Ironically, a Seton Hall University representative was speaking on opportunities of increasing minorities in health care. At this point, the young men had tentative plans for future careers. Davis, with strong math skills, would pursue business. Jenkins would be a dentist, and Hunt planned to be a teacher. The young men formed a pact to support each other through college and life. Overtime with Jenkins leading the group applied for a college program at Seton Hall University for minority students interested in becoming doctors. Dr. Davis said, “Quite honestly it was God’s plan. Anytime you take a huge challenge in becoming a physician there is usually some sort of plan or blueprint behind it. It was faith. We believed in God and stepped out on faith and things started to happen for us. Things started to cultivate and before we knew it, we were doctors. It wasn’t that easy.”

Dr. Davis explained college and medical school brought on mental fatigue, that discouraged him. “I remember going through long nights of college and medical school, wanting to quit and give up on myself and go back home. But then I realized the importance of staying and completing not only for myself, but also for my community, and my two lifetime friends. I realized the importance of staying focused.” Dr. Jenkins spoke on the importance and quality of their friendship. Their friendship served as a conscious check when he became lax in his studies. As an example, they all lived together, and one day he put in half an effort to study, and decided to go party. Eventually, he would walk past the room shared by Davis and Hunt, and see them, vigorously studying as if their lives depended on it.” Guilt drew him back to studying, increasing his chances for a higher grade. Jenkins said their friendship also helped them become better men. If an individual was weak in some areas, where the other friends displayed strength, they provided help and supported each other. “Our friendship is almost unprecedented, at least put out there in public. Guys don’t like to share their weaknesses with each other. It was easy for us because we’ve been friends for so long. We developed a brotherhood over the years that sustained us through all levels of education as well as today. I encourage you all to do the same with like-minded people in your classes. We received exponential benefits in college, because we were friends.”

Dr. Hunt spoke on lessons of self-value, which was enhanced through ‘The Pact’. Growing up he didn’t have examples of strong male role models. Nonetheless, he took matters into his own hands. Mentally he chose a popular guy in school to emulate. He would emulate the way he talked, walked, and everything he knew about the person. His rationale was to emulate the popular person everyone liked, so eventually everyone would like him too. “That behavior got me in trouble so I had to pick somebody else. It was just crazy if you could imagine me picking a new person e

April 10, 2003
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