Insight News

Friday
Jul 25th

Remake of classic splatterflick repeatedly relies on eroticized violence as entertainment

Remake of classic splatterflick repeatedly relies on eroticized violence as entertainmentI must have missed something, because I don’t exactly remember the Eighties being the Golden Age of Entertainment.? Nonetheless, in lieu of coming up with some original ideas, Hollywood has decided to revisit a number of mostly underwhelming offerings from the decade as a source of cinematic inspiration.

Consequently, 2010 is likely to be remembered as the year of the Eighties remakes, with Clash of the Titans already in theaters and new versions of The A-Team, The Karate Kid, Red Dawn, Tron and Wall Street all to follow.

Back in 1984, Wes Craven’s introduced the world to Freddy Krueger in A Nightmare on Elm Street, the grisly slasher flick which would spawn seven sequels before ostensibly petering out in 2003. Now, award-wining, music video director Samuel Bayer has revived the franchise, making a most-inauspicious feature film debut with this dreadful remake loosely based on the initial installment in the series.
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Misogynists meet their matches in Cape Cod costume dramedy

Misogynists  meet their matches in Cape Cod costume dramedy

The Lightkeepers

One of the best episodes of The Little Rascals was the He-Man Woman Haters Club in which Spanky and the gang promised each other they’d never associate with girls only to have Alfalfa break the pact by falling head over heels for adorable Darla. The Lightkeepers, directed by Daniel Adams (The Golden Boys), is an adult-oriented variation on the same basic theme, a character-driven dramedy with a point of departure of June of 1912.

The film stars Richard Dreyfuss as Seth Atkins, the lonely keeper of the Eastham lighthouse, located at the tip of a peninsula on Cape Cod. As the film unfolds, we find Seth living by himself, but it isn’t long before he has himself a male companion when John Brown’s body (Tom Wisdom) washes ashore.

Once revived, the almost-drowned, young stranger claims to have fallen off a passing steamship, which is a good enough explanation for the crusty curmudgeon who could use a little company, given the distance to town. Better yet, when the pair get to talking, they discover they share a distaste for the opposite sex, having both been decidedly unlucky at love.
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Damning DVD recalls rise and fall of legendary GOP Hatchet Man

Damning DVD recalls rise and fall of legendary GOP Hatchet Man Boogie Man: The Lee Atwater Story

Harvey Leroy ‘Lee’ Atwater (1951-1991) was barely out of his teens when he burst onto the political scene in South Carolina in the early Seventies. Back then, the guitar-playing wunderkind loved the blues almost as much as he did serving as a consultant to conservatives during election campaigns.

A protégé of Strom Thurmond, he learned the tricks of the trade at the feet of an inveterate racist who once swore that blood would run in the streets of his state before he would allow integration. Thurmond, in fact, was such a hypocrite that he remained a bigot even after fathering a child with a 15 year-old Black servant.

As for Atwater, he devoted most of his days to denying African-Americans equal rights. And while he might have repented shortly before succumbing to brain cancer, that 11th-hour confession did little to undo the damage he had inflicted on minorities as the architect of the Reagan revolution.
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Two Old Black Guys: Raw, gritty, humorous and real

Two Old Black Guys: Raw, gritty, humorous and realPenumbra does it again… but that’s a statement that assumes that there was ever any doubt in the world premiere of their new play, Two Old Black Guys Just Sitting Around Talking.

If the title is a mouthful, it only places second to the incredible tug of war story, sewn together between two elder Black men whose lifelong hate for one another, provides an unbreakable bond of necessity and brotherly love.

The story, written by Virgin Islands native and retired University of Arizona professor Gus Edwards, isn’t your typical tale spawn from a problem and met with a cliché resolve. Rather, it illustrates a truer depiction of life and the art of getting around its many challenges, by focusing more on a cloud’s silver lining without pretending that in the end there will never be another storm.
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Mo’Nique at the Orpheum Theatre

Mo’Nique at the Orpheum Theatre When it all began for Mo’Nique Imes-Jackson, things weren’t always a laughing matter. Coming from a troubling start after suffering abuse at the hands of her very own brother, the actress got tough and found a way to outsmart her circumstances.

Through the craft and tool of joke telling, intelligence and a natural charisma, Mo’Nique superseded her prior conditions by claiming her right to offer everyone she touched a permanent smile. With each of her career endeavors, she has seen a multitude of success and fortune that naturally place second when you compare them to the richness in her spirit.

The comedian, whose claim to fame started on the UPN television series “The Parkers” and also an author of the bestselling book Skinny Women are Evil, has hosted a Beauty Pageant on the Oxygen Network for Plus Size women called “F.A.T. Chance” and is now the host of her own BET talk show called “The Mo’Nique Show.” Aside from that, she also has many films under her belt that illustrate her talent and her progression through the arts.
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Bobby Rush Revue returns to Wilebski Blues Saloon

Bobby Rush Revue returns to Wilebski Blues SaloonBlues master Bobby Rush, one of the enduring elder statesmen of American Blues music, returns to Twin Cities next week for two shows Saturday night, May 15, at Wilebski’s Blues Saloon, 601 Western Av., St. Paul.

It will be a grand reunion performance event. Rush helped build the legend of Wilebeski’s as a bona fide Blues saloon a couple of decades ago when over the years, Rush brought his world-famous Blues Revue to the St. Paul Club.

Where Bobby Rush went, other Blues masters followed. Wilebski hosted the giants of the idiom including Buddy Guy, Muddy Waters, Johnny Taylor and others.
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Book review: “The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates”


Book review: “The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates”
“This is the story of two boys living in Baltimore with similar histories and an identical name: Wes Moore. One of us is free and has experienced things that he never knew to dream about as a kid. The other will spend every day until his death behind bars for an armed robbery that left a police officer and father of five dead.

The chilling truth is that his story could have been mine. The tragedy is that my story could have been his. Our stories are obviously specific to our two lives, but I hope they will illuminate the crucial inflection points in every life, the sudden moments of decision where our paths diverge and our fates are sealed...

It is my sincere hope that this book does not come across as self-congratulatory or self-exculpatory… Rather, this book will use our lives as a way of thinking about choices and accountability, not just for each of us as individuals, but for all of us as a society.

This book is meant to show how, for those of us who live in the most precarious places in this country, our destinies can be determined by a single stumble down the wrong path, or a tentative step down the right one. This is our story.”

-- Excerpted from the Introduction (pgs. xi-xiv)
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  • July 22, 2014
    "Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art " at Walker Art Center... Valerie Cassel Oliver, curator; Fionn Meade, Walker coordinating curator; artist Jamal Cyrus and artist Maren Hassenger.

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