Insight News

Thursday
Jul 24th

Price educates public in his search for kidney

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The Dec. 10 Insight/KMOJ Public Policy Forum provided a vital community service, alerting the public that one among us is in peril. Retired professional William Price, Ph.D. who has contributed... The Dec. 10 Insight/KMOJ Public Policy Forum provided a vital community service, alerting the public that one among us is in peril. Retired professional William Price, Ph.D. who has contributed to countless lives, needs a vital contribution, himself. Price, currently on dialysis three times a week at Davita Clinic, must have an immediate kidney transplant.

Price came to the Twin Cities from Marshall, Mo. 27 years to complete his doctoral studies in social work and child development at the University of Minnesota has remained, serving over time, as a high school principal, an educator, a mentor and, at Hennepin County Family Services, as a clinical social worker. “I believe I still have a great deal to give here,” says Dr. Price.

During the course of his past giving, Price succumbed to hypertension. In September 2000, he received a kidney from a cadaver donor. Price said his body is now rejecting the transplanted kidney, the result being that his kidney can no longer filter waste and regulate fluids throughout his system. Due to the rapid deterioration of his condition, it’s now necessary for him to have a living person donate a kidney in order for the operation to have the best results. Living donors can give a kidney without fear of diminishing themselves. They still live productive healthy lives, including participation in sports activities, at the same level they now enjoy.

The National Kidney Foundation states that 20,000 Americans have kidney disease, that nearly 11 percent African Americans have diabetes and that diabetes and high-blood pressure are the major cause of kidney failure among these individuals. At this moment, roughly 80,000 people are on waiting lists to receive kidney transplants. “If we had more people donating,” Price said, “more of us would have a second chance. I don’t think we think about that. We need more education [on the subject] in communities of color, especially in the African American community.”

Prospective donors may contact Carmen, his coordinator at Abbott Northwestern Hospital Transplant Center at (612) 863-5638 for information about being tested for compatibility. They can also reach Price directly at (612) 521-8774 or by e-mail at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Things to know: you must be Blood Type O; Price’s insurance will cover the donor; anyone, regardless of gender or race can qualify as a donor.
 

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