Insight News

Tuesday
Jul 22nd

Former Army Secretary opens oral history training conference

E-mail Print PDF

NVLP Fellows prepare to videotape an oral history interview
with an African American elder.

Thirty talented college students from across the country will experience living history first-hand during an upcoming conference that brings the generations together to document and preserve African American history. The National Visionary Leadership Project (NVLP) 2007 Visionary Heritage Fellows Program (VHFP) Leadership and Training Conference takes place July 21-25 at Howard University in Washington, DC. The Visionary Heritage Fellows Program is generously sponsored by Time Warner Inc.

NVLP Fellows prepare to videotape an oral history interview
with an African American elder.
From LtoR: Sean Crump (Coppin State Univ.), Tiffany Shepard (Hampton University), and Bianca L'erin Robinson (Howard University).


Thirty talented college students from across the country will experience living history first-hand during an upcoming conference that brings the generations together to document and preserve African American history. The National Visionary Leadership Project (NVLP) 2007 Visionary Heritage Fellows Program (VHFP) Leadership and Training Conference takes place July 21-25 at Howard University in Washington, DC. The Visionary Heritage Fellows Program is generously sponsored by Time Warner Inc.

The exciting week will begin with an opening ceremony featuring a leadership discussion with Clifford L. Alexander, Jr. the first African American Secretary of the Army, whose extraordinary career includes counseling presidents, increasing diversity hiring opportunities, and leading the U.S. Army transition to an all-volunteer force. The conference will also include a leadership discussion led by noted civil rights leader Rev. Dr. Willie T. Barrow, minister, activist, and Chairman Emeritus of the Rainbow PUSH Coalition.
Co-founded by educator and producer Camille O. Cosby, Ed.D. and award-winning former network correspondent Renee Poussaint, NVLP is a nonprofit organization that conducts videotaped interviews with "Visionaries," legendary African American elders who have shaped history. Through its Visionary Heritage Fellows Program, NVLP trains college students in the skills necessary to complete an independent study project that documents the lives of local visionary elders they choose from their own communities. The interviews are added to the invaluable NVLP archives, available at www.visionaryproject.org
"It's vitally important that we document these stories," said NVLP Co-founder and President Camille O. Cosby, Ed.D. "In doing so, we not only set the record straight on history, but we also are able to share insight and wisdom invaluable for guiding all of our lives," Dr. Cosby added.

The conference helps students develop the necessary skills to complete their Visionary interview/research project and includes workshops on oral history, research and interviewing techniques, as well as video production. The highlight of the week is when the students conduct a group interview with a "Legacy Keeper," a prominent Washington, DC area African American elder. "You can read about it in history books, but hearing it from personal experience makes it that much deeper for you," said Jessica Smith, a 2005 VHFP Fellow from West Chester University. This year's Legacy Keepers are: Charles Cassell, architect and founder of the Charlin Jazz Society; Doris Harrison, six-time American Tennis Association National champion who launched the "Tennis Youth Movement" in Washington, DC in the 1960s and introduced tennis to inner-city youth; Theresa Jones, community activist and member of the United Planning Organization; Richard "Dick" Morgan, pianist, recording artist and attorney; and William Spaulding, a member of the first DC Council, mechanical engineer with the National Security Agency, and educator.

Workshops are led by NVLP staff, including NVLP Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer Renee Poussaint. "It is not only the need to capture our history, it is the need to transmit that history to our young people and get them involved in capturing it, so they will apply the lessons learned to their lives today and, hopefully, help solve the problems of tomorrow," said Ms. Poussaint.

NVLP's unprecedented collection of interviews include: authors Maya Angelou and Toni Morrison; musicians Ray Charles, B.B. King and Quincy Jones; actors
 

Recent Comments

Powered by Disqus



Facebook Twitter RSS Image Map

Latest show

  • July 15, 2014
    Pippi Ardenia, jazz vocalist, singer/songwriter and Andre Fischer, executive director for Twin Cities Mobile Jazz Project.

Business & Community Service Network