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Friday
Nov 28th

Oliver Hill dies; who will replace civil rights legends?

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Oliver Hill dies; who will replace civil rights legends?

Here's a test; read the following paragraph, and then tell me where it comes from:

We conclude that, in the field of public education, the doctrine of 'separate but equal' has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal. Therefore, we hold that the plaintiffs and others similarly situated for whom the actions have been brought are, by reason of the segregation complained of, deprived of the equal protection of the laws guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment. This disposition makes unnecessary any discussion whether such segregation also violates the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

Here's a test; read the following
paragraph, and then tell me where it comes from:

We conclude that, in the field of public education, the doctrine of 'separate but equal' has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal. Therefore, we hold that the plaintiffs and others similarly situated for whom the actions have been brought are, by reason of the segregation complained of, deprived of the equal protection of the laws guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment. This disposition makes unnecessary any discussion whether such segregation also violates the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

source, I will tell you later.

Whoa . . . Did you read it twice??

Second test; ask yourself if you have read about this person in Black history:

In 1940, Hill won his first civil rights case in Virginia, one that required equal pay for Black and White teachers. Eight years later, he was the first Black elected to Richmond's City Council since Reconstruction.

Who is Hill? Well, unknown to me until recently, as with many in our community, Oliver W. Hill was a civil rights lawyer who was at the front of the legal effort that desegregated public schools. Hill died in August 2007 at the ripe old age of 100.

In 1954, Hill was part of a series of lawsuits against racially segregated public schools that became the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision, which changed America's society by setting the foundation for integrated education. Hill graduated second in his class from Howard University Law School. Whoa -- second to whom, you might ask? Deceased Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall.

Now the answer to the source of the opening paragraph: Brown v. Board of Education opinion as written by the Supreme Court on May 17, 1954.

Jump ahead in time to July 28, 2007; Oliver Hill lived long enough to see the landmark case, which he along with deceased Justice Thurgood Marshall argued before the Supreme Court, overturned by the Supreme Court (the cases are Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District No. 1, 05-908; and Meredith v. Jefferson County Board of Education, 05-915.)

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas in the opinion statements sided with Chief Supreme Justice Roberts, Justices Alito, Kennedy and Scalia.

"What was wrong in 1954 cannot be right today," Thomas wrote. "The plans before us base school assignment decisions on students' race. Because ‘our Constitution is colorblind, and neither knows nor tolerates classes among citizens,' such race-based decision making is unconstitutional."

For Justice Thomas' education, when the Constitution of the United States was drafted and signed, Blacks were considered property. Blacks had no rights, privileges or say in this process, if I recall history. However; I am not about to make this a Supreme Justice Clarence Thomas issue. I am about to make this an issue of education, and how the lack of (including his also) has affected the Black business community.

When the bondage of slavery was abolished, the conversation might have gone something like this: "You are free to go," the slave master said. "Go where?" the now freed slave replied. "Anywhere you want," the slave master replied. "But master, I've been on this here plantation my entire life; I don't know where to go. I can't read or write; I dumb, master," replied the now freed slave. "You don't have a home now, but you got to git," replied the heartbroken slave master. You get the gist of the conversation.

Fast forward to 2007; millions of Blacks have no money, no education and no direction, but we are free. The country still this has a huge problem much like when slavery
 

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