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Aug 20th

The Link between Nutrition and IQ

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The Link between Nutrition and IQ
Husband and wife team, Dr. Gregory and Marcelynn Clark

Food is essential. Have you considered why your body is so dependent on food, beyond its ability to alleviate hunger pains? Have you given it much thought beyond the first gulp and swallow of a tasty bite? What effect does food have on your body after passing down the throat and into the digestion system? Food is essential. Have you considered why your body is so dependent on food, beyond its ability to alleviate hunger pains? Have you given it much thought beyond the first gulp and swallow of a tasty bite? What effect does food have on your body after passing down the throat and into the digestion system? Have you considered that your last meal may have directly effected your mental capacity?

An excerpt from the book, 'The Link between Nutrition and IQ - How foods affect attention span, memory, and learning" (IBS Publishing 2007), reads: 'Nutrition plays a vital role in the overall process of learning. The foods we eat have the power to boost our intellectual IQ or to diminish it."

In fact, the book's authors, husband and wife team Dr. Gregory and Marcelynn Clark, go on to prove, 'Students who eat breakfast tend to have higher grades, longer attention spans, and a more active role in class discussions. Children who skip breakfast are often inattentive, sluggish and tend to have lower grades."

These points are proven in the book's thorough account of the body's make-up in the chapter titled 'Our Body's System," which explains the connection of cells, tissue, organs and the function of interdependent systems such as the muscular, respiratory and nervous systems. The Clarks then offer a detailed analysis of the body's breakdown of food beginning with the chapter 'The Chemical Journey of Food," followed by subsequent chapters explaining the effects of carbohydrates, neurotransmitters, stress and exercise. The book is clear and concise, aiming to appeal to young and old readers. Diagrams found throughout the book offer detailed guides on alternatives to junk food. For example it suggests eating cookies sweetened with healthier sweeteners (pure maple syrup, stevia, or honey), instead of high fat cookies with sugar. Or, the book suggests eating dates, grapes, cherries and other fruit in place of candy.

Marcelynn admits, 'I have challenges with reducing sugar in my diet. Sometimes I lose. Since our children are with me most of the time, they know when I lose because they are the recipients of some of this candy. Granted they are smart and like most children, they try to manipulate me into buying candy. However, I also know how to say 'No."

Dr. Clark said 'no" to a life of hypertension sixteen yeas ago when he decided to become a vegetarian (vegan): 'When people think about food, they do not realize that it is composed of chemicals, some of which are beneficial and some of which are not . . . I observed a complete turnaround in my health and stress levels as I began to incorporate gradual changes in my diet. As I researched and learned about the effects of diet on health, stress management, and mental clarity, I began to share this knowledge with others." Dr. Clark often gives seminars on healthy eating to promote a holistic approach to a healthy life.

In 2005 and again in July, 2007, the Clarks gave presentations at the symposium for National Black Home Educators (NBHE), on the effects of nutrition on learning. They explained to the audience that adopting healthy eating patterns is doable with proper planning. Maracelynn said, 'If you plan ahead, you can prepare your food the night before an outing by slicing an apple, orange or other fruit then all you have to do is reach in the fridge before leaving the house. Another idea is to prepare three or four salads and place them in individual bowls with salad dressing in another bowl. Three or four-ounce bowls with lids can be found in many stores and are perfect for carrying salad dressing. Can you imagine how happy your body would be if you ate a serving of fruit and salad every day instead of over-processed and chemically-laden food? Just think of the results of such a prac
 

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