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Wednesday
Oct 22nd

Web tool makes it easier for people to have a say in sentencing

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Residents and business owners know how livability crimes affect their neighborhoods. Now, an Internet tool makes it possible for them to share that information with the courts, so that the true impact of crime in our neighborhoods can be taken into account when sentencing an offender. Residents and business owners know how livability crimes affect their neighborhoods. Now, an Internet tool makes it possible for them to share that information with the courts, so that the true impact of crime in our neighborhoods can be taken into account when sentencing an offender.

For the first time, the City of Minneapolis has made it possible to give a community impact statement online rather than in person. By filling out a short community impact statement, people can tell the courts how crimes really affect the livability of their neighborhood. Prosecutors can then present these statements to judges during sentencing.

In addition to the online convenience, the search tool makes it easier to search through the database of cases. Residents can look up cases by offense, alleged offender, street address or general location of the offense.

You can get to the community impact statement Internet page by going to the City Attorney's Web site: www.ci.minneapolis.mn.us/attorney.

The online tool covers people charged with livability offenses such as trespassing, consuming in public, disorderly conduct, loitering with intent to buy or sell narcotics, lurking and public urination. These offenses can have a significant impact on people who live and work in the area. By giving a voice to these affected people, community impact statements show the court that these are not victimless crimes.
 

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