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Sep 02nd

Do Me Twice: My Life After Islam by Sonsyrea Tate

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"Do Me Twice: My Life After Islam" by Sonsyrea Tate

"To our children we give two things: one is roots; the other, wings".
When a baby is born, the adults in its life see possibility. The child can be so many things; can do so much in the years ahead, if only he or she is furnished with a good foundation and a nudge toward the right path in life. The question is, do you pray for a smooth road for him or her, or do you place a few bumps along the way to season the young traveler?
In the new memoir "Do Me Twice: My Life After Islam" by Sonsyrea Tate, you'll read about one woman's coming-of-age as she questions her roots, spreads her wings, and finds her own strength.


"To our children we give two things: one is roots; the other, wings".

When a baby is born, the adults in its life see possibility. The child can be so many things; can do so much in the years ahead, if only he or she is furnished with a good foundation and a nudge toward the right path in life. The question is, do you pray for a smooth road for him or her, or do you place a few bumps along the way to season the young traveler?

In the new memoir "Do Me Twice: My Life After Islam" by Sonsyrea Tate, you'll read about one woman's coming-of-age as she questions her roots, spreads her wings, and finds her own strength.

Sonsyrea Tate grew up in a family that followed Islamic teachings. Tate was raised to defer to men and to avoid eye contact with them, and she was supposed to never be alone with a man to whom she wasn't related. She says her mother preached modesty and budgeting, and wanted nothing more for her daughters than that they become "good Muslim wives".

As the eldest daughter, Tate wanted to set a good example for her siblings, but she questioned these tenets.

Why, she asked, did her religion change its tenets every few decades? Did God listen closer to Arabic than he did to English? Was Islam out of touch with modern life? Tate chafed at the restrictions put upon her, and she rebelle.... right into the arms of The Boy Next Door, a former prison inmate and fellow Muslim.

Her marriage was rocky, and short-lived. Unable or unwilling to find employment, Tate's husband cheated on her, partied constantly, and seemed unsupportive of Tate's goals of college and a journalism career. On the night that he raped her, Tate realized that she needed to get away from her husband. When he was arrested, she told him there was no money for bail. She refused his collect calls.

On her own, Tate stuck to her studies, found a job she loved, and partied with her friends, almost as if to make up for time lost. But the teachings of Allah were always there in the back of her mind and she practiced her faith as a matter of comfort. After all, could twenty years' of religion ever be undone?

It had to have been hard - cathartic, perhaps, but hard - to put this story to paper, but "Do Me Twice" is a book that shouts of strength, reflection, and anger mixed with the kind of love you only find within a struggling family. Author Sonsyrea Tate is blunt and sometimes harsh with her memories and some language and situations will make readers blush and cringe. Still, it's hard to argue with truth, and Tate doesn't candy-coat a thing in this compelling, hard-to-put-down memoir of religion, relations, and the journey of a soul.

If you've ever questioned the kind of upbringing you had, take some down-time and read this book. "Do Me Twice" is a memoir with wings.

"Do Me Twice: My Life After Islam" by Sonsyrea Tate
c.2007, Atria $15.00 / $18.99 Canada 288 pages
 

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