Insight News

Sunday
Oct 26th

Book Review: Daughters of Men

E-mail Print PDF

Even with technology as it is today, it's amazing how many parents-to-be want to "be surprised" at the gender of their yet-unborn child. They want the anticipation to last until that first squall. They choose two names, one for a boy-child and one for a girl, and they wait. Sometimes, the surprise will wear blue for his time in the crib. And sometimes--especially for the father who now has a Daddy's Little Girl--the surprise comes with feelings he never thought he could have. "Daughters of Men" by Rachel Vassel, foreword by Michael Eric Dyson
c.2007, Amistad | $27.95 / $32.95 Canada | 170 pages

Even with technology as it is today, it's amazing how many parents-to-be want to "be surprised" at the gender of their yet-unborn child. They want the anticipation to last until that first squall. They choose two names, one for a boy-child and one for a girl, and they wait.

Sometimes, the surprise will wear blue for his time in the crib. And sometimes--especially for the father who now has a Daddy's Little Girl--the surprise comes with feelings he never thought he could have.

In the new book "Daughters of Men" by Rachel Vassel, foreword by Michael Eric Dyson, you'll read about a few of those fathers, in the words of the no-longer-little girls who adore them.

Every woman who's grown up knowing her father has specific memories of him. In this gorgeous gift book, author Rachel Vassel asked over 40 African American women to talk about that first man in their lives. Some fathers, like Vassel's own, were semi-absent for one reason or another. Others felt their father's influence every day.
Most still do.

Chief justice of the Georgia Supreme Court Leah Ward Sears, Esq. talks about how her father called her "Princess", making her half-believe that she really was royalty. Her father gave her a chance to travel and see the world and other cultures. Even though he died nearly two decades ago, she says she still admires the stability he had.
Cathy Hughes, founder of Radio One, Inc., remembers her father who waited tables because racism kept him from other opportunities. Despite that, Hughes says her father never let disappointments affect his outlook on life, a lesson she keeps.

Singer Brandy Norwood says her father taught her music. His love of song, the openness with which he led his life, and the values he imparted to her still teach her.

Thelma Golden, director of the Studio Museum in Harlem writes about her father who taught her the value of money and the beauty of the arts. She still recalls how, when she was a child, he found big lessons for her in the most unusual ways.

"Daughters of Men" is one of those books that won't be on the Best Seller List (but should) and might even escape your notice (but shouldn't). All of the women in this book are accomplished and / or famous, and their stories, while similar, will warm your heart. Best of all, there's room in the back of the book for a picture and a multi-page place for you to write your own essay about the man you call "Dad".

In his foreword, Michael Eric Dyson points out that much has been said in books and other media about the future of young black males, but we mustn't forget that black girls need guidance, too. With that in mind, pick up a copy of "Daughters of Men" for yourself and any man with a little girl in his life. You'll both be pleased and surprised at the sentiment and encouragement that this book provides.
 

Recent Comments

Powered by Disqus



Facebook Twitter RSS Image Map

Latest show

  • October 14, 2014
    Demetrius Pendleton, Clyde Bellecourt, David Glass, Henry Wusha, Joey Brenner, Spike Moss and Tyrone Terrill.

Business & Community Service Network