Insight News

Wednesday
Oct 22nd

New Bill Cosby book; same unfair criticism

E-mail Print PDF

Bill Cosby has an awful lot of gall propping himself up as some sort of walking edict to call Black parents to accountability. He has been loudly criticizing the hell out of Black communities over the past decade, dunning us for not raising our kids right - as if he is the conscience at large for millions of adults whose children would be just fine, grow up properly and become wonderfully productive citizens if everybody would just listen to him. Bill Cosby has an awful lot of gall propping himself up as some sort of walking edict to call Black parents to accountability. He has been loudly criticizing the hell out of Black communities over the past decade, dunning us for not raising our kids right - as if he is the conscience at large for millions of adults whose children would be just fine, grow up properly and become wonderfully productive citizens if everybody would just listen to him. Now, with Dr. Alvin F. Poussaint, he writes this book self-righteously titled, "Come on People! On The Path from Victims to Victors."

And he has Publishers Weekly backing him up, describing it as "a powerful message for families and communities as they lay out their visions for strengthening America . . [that will address] the crises of people who are stuck because of feelings of low self-esteem, abandonment, anger, fearfulness, sadness and feelings of being used, undefended and unprotected [with the purpose] to help empower people to make the daunting transition from victims to victors."

Hogwash. Excerpts clearly show that Cosby is up to his same old routine of ragging on people because they have a very hard time acquitting themselves as model parents in urban environments that by their very design - including lousy public schools and arrest-happy cops - ensure that Black kids know more about the streets than about how to read and are so predestined for incarceration it's a miracle when they reach adulthood without having gone to jail.

"We forgot to become entrepreneurs. We forgot to look out for education. We forgot to look out for each other," Cosby proclaims. "Black communities and families must provide our youth with the love and guidance that keeps them strong and on the positive path. Blaming white people can be a way for some Black people to feel better about themselves, but it does not pay the electric bills."

Well, nothing pays the electric bill except money. And if America at large is have a hard time going through this depressed economy, you can damn sure bet low-income people - especially Black Americans who face employment discrimination - are catching pure and absolute economic hell. That somehow escapes this man who has more money than he could possibly live long enough to spend. Spewing smarmy pap about providing love, guidance and a strong path is all well and good when parents aren't themselves products of dysfunctional upbringing or embattled by their own feelings of futility; when crippled self-esteem doesn't prompt them to make foolish, self-limiting - even self-destructive - decisions based more on immediate gratification than on long-range good. How the hell are they supposed to be nobly empowering role models when most of them have never been taught how to do a damned thing right themselves?

Come on Bill Cosby. Get down from on self-anointed high, since you're so entitled to denounce Black people. Come down and do something to help solve the problems instead of kicking the people who are going through them. You and your wife gave more than $50 million to Howard University - which didn't even need it - while lesser known Black colleges struggle just to keep their doors open, let alone lavish financial wherewithal on students whose parents are filthy rich. Then you want to turn around, stand before the NAACP in 2004 and claim that "the lower economic and lower middle economic people are not holding their end in this deal."

Bull. In whatever deal Cosby is bad-mouthing us about, why has he yet to put even part of $50 million where his mouth is, and instead of donating riches to the privileged, spend it rehabilitating Black communities? You wanna talk about electric bills? Offer a program by which parents who make sure their kids do their homework get their electric bill paid. For that
 

Recent Comments

Powered by Disqus



Facebook Twitter RSS Image Map

Latest show

  • October 14, 2014
    Demetrius Pendleton, Clyde Bellecourt, David Glass, Henry Wusha, Joey Brenner, Spike Moss and Tyrone Terrill.

Business & Community Service Network