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Apr 20th

Grace After Midnight by Felicia Snoop Pearson and David Ritz

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Sometimes, all anybody ever needs to succeed is a break.
Just one good chance, that's all. A helping hand, a leg up, a little faith. Sometimes, all anybody ever needs to succeed is loving support. Or, as you'll see in the new memoir by Felicia "Snoop" Pearson (with David Ritz), it takes a little "Grace After Midnight" for someone to catch a break. Sometimes, all anybody ever needs to succeed is a break.
Just one good chance, that's all. A helping hand, a leg up, a little faith. Sometimes, all anybody ever needs to succeed is loving support.

Or, as you'll see in the new memoir by Felicia "Snoop" Pearson (with David Ritz), it takes a little "Grace After Midnight" for someone to catch a break.

Snoop Pearson says she doesn't remember much about her birth mother except that she was tall and beautiful. She recalls wanting to go live with her mother forever, but the courts wouldn't allow it.

Especially after her birth mother stole Pearson's clothes, locked her small daughter in the closet and bought crack with the frilly little dress.

Pearson was raised by an elderly couple that she came to call Mama and Papa. They gave Pearson a good foundation, immersed her in family, and taught her to pray. But prayer and family weren't enough to keep Snoop off the streets. By the time she was eight years old, Snoop was skipping school and "holding" for several dealers on the streets. Not long after that, she was running her own corner.

Snoop was known for her cool and her attitude as a tough little girl who happened to like women. She took no hassle from anybody and she would fight any time.

And that got her in trouble.

Even though the two most important men in her life warned her off the streets, Snoop stayed. It was the only life she knew, but that was to change. In a fit of anger and in self-defense, Pearson shot a woman and killed her. At a time when most kids were just starting to drive, Snoop Pearson was sent to jail where, surprisingly, she found love, support, education, and a chance to turn her life in another direction.

When she was out from behind bars, Pearson tried to start her new life. She landed a few jobs, but her record branded her as an ex-con. Discouraged, and not seeing a clean path quite as clearly, Snoop went back to the streets.

And then, in the right place at the right time, somebody gave her a break.

I was a little afraid, as I started this book, that I was in for just another celebrity "I-came-from-the-hood" kind of bio.

That wasn't the case at all.

"Grace After Midnight" is a powerful, slap-in-the-face kind of book that tells it like it is without candy-coating a thing, but what comes across as the most potent is author and actor Felicia "Snoop" Pearson's dynamic voice. She doesn't brag. She doesn't whine. She doesn't point fingers at anyone but herself and she doesn't embellish her stories. Instead, Pearson is chillingly matter-of-fact with a curious almost-child-like innocence laden with street-smarts.

Did I say I loved this memoir?
"Grace After Midnight" is a skinny book, but it's packed with a great big story that you shouldn't miss. Pick this book up today. It's a great read for whenever you just want a break.

"Grace After Midnight" by Felicia "Snoop" Pearson and David Ritz
c.2007, Grand Central Publishing $22.00 / $25.50 Canada 233 pages
 

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