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Apr 25th

What to (and not to) expect from an Obama White House

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Earl Ofari Hutchinson

A President Barack Obama will be the most scrutinized president since Abraham Lincoln. Ironically, the reason for this has less to do with race, though that will loom large in the lens of many, as it has to do with him. He's lifted public passions and expectations to the clouds with his soaring rhetoric about hope and change; the man who can repair the shambles of Bush's domestic and foreign policies. A President Barack Obama will be the most scrutinized president since Abraham Lincoln. Ironically, the reason for this has less to do with race, though that will loom large in the lens of many, as it has to do with him. He's lifted public passions and expectations to the clouds with his soaring rhetoric about hope and change; the man who can repair the shambles of Bush's domestic and foreign policies.

That's quite a cross for a Senator halfway through his first term, with a wafer- thin voting record, little experience with foreign policy matters, and who's still fuzzy, or to put it more charitably, with a still work-in-progress program on affordable health care, education, criminal justice system reform, tax policy and the housing crisis. A man who needs to pound consistency into his pronouncements that at times seem at odds with the other pronouncements he's made on winding down the Iraq war and the terrorism fight.

The jury is still way out on just how many of those inflated expectations he can fulfill. But there are glaring clues as to how much change he can or will even try to make. One is his record in the Illinois state legislature. At first glance, his votes and views during his days in the Illinois Senate on taxes, abortion, civil liberties, civil rights, law enforcement and on capital punishment give much comfort to those who crave for him to make the change he hints at. His stance on tax hikes marked him with some business and taxpayer interest groups as another tax-and-spend Democrat, and his views on social issues marked him as an unabashed liberal.

He's anything but that, and that's another clue as to what to expect from an Obama White House. He's a centrist Democrat who is fast replacing the Clintons with the Democratic Party's shot callers as the consummate party insider; their new go-to guy. Corporate donors, Hollywood moguls, and through the back door with him fat-cat lobbyists with the quiet nod of Democratic Party insiders have dumped millions into his campaign. They don't shower money, favors and promotional praise on a candidate unless they are comfortable that the candidate will not stray to far off the beaten political path and abandon the moderate, respectable approach to policy making.

In the White House, Obama will move cautiously and do everything he can to ensure that the tag "liberal" won't be slapped on him. The majority of Congressional Democrats and Republicans are centrist to conservative to even ultra-conservative. They would instantly draw their line in the sand against him if he makes a quick push for big tax hikes for education and health care to a push for a quick withdrawal from Iraq which Obama does not favor.

He will do everything he can to escape the fate that befell Bill Clinton the instant he touched a toe in the White House. Republicans waged a gutter- wallowing personal and political stealth, and at times, open war against him and his policies, and Clinton made no pretense of being a liberal Democrat. Their attack arsenal included everything from personal slander to stonewalling his judicial appointments and his stab at health care reform. That forced Clinton to tiptoe even further to the right on the death penalty, beefing up police power, gay rights, welfare reform, and reining in bloated military spending, while assuring that the Democratic Party would not pander to minorities and the poor.

Obama's pro-choice and abortion rights defense in the Illinois legislature earned him a perfect rating from the Illinois Planned Parenthood Council. And he was a major backer of legislation limiting police interrogations and requiring police to keep racial stats on unwarranted traffic stops, and he supported strict gun control. These are three hyper-sensitive issues for conservatives.
 

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