Insight News

Thursday
Nov 20th

Business

Sabathani sponsors estate planning fair for seniors

Sabathani Senior Center will sponsor an Estate Planning Fair from 10 am to 1 pm Friday, May 14 at Sabathani Community Center, 310 E. 38th St., Suite 106. The event is free of charge and is geared toward senior adults.   

Teams of lawyers from Dorsey & Whitney LLP and UnitedHealth Group will be available to draft simple wills, health care directives and financial powers of attorney. Pre-registration is required. All participants must bring all documents related to their needs, including relevant information about their assets, insurance and the names and addresses of designated beneficiaries. Documents will be prepared for completion and signature on the day of the event.

Pre-register for this event by calling the Senior Center at (612) 821-2306 to make an appointment. Sabathani Senior Center is a program of Sabathani Community Center, Inc.
 

Free life coaching service empowers women to succeed


Free life coaching service empowers women to succeed
Sometimes, all somebody needs is a leg up. Kids, parents, work, laundry… Women today face a long list of challenges. Many have overcome the setbacks of divorce, mental illness, substance abuse or poverty. Finally ready to move forward and put the past behind them, these courageous women may find closed doors at every turn. Fortunately, an organization exists that offers women the encouragement and support that can help them move from “Ready” to “Successful.”

I first heard about One to One: Women Coaching Women, from a friend who is also a coach in the program. She said, “We never have a waiting list, and we should.” One to One’s mission is to enable women to “achieve sustained success by creating the life of their dreams” through free one-to-one life coaching. Targeting its services to women from challenging social and economic backgrounds, One to One provides an upbeat, affirming relationship where a struggling woman’s hopes can be translated into “practical, realistic and actionable life plans.”
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NBMBAA/Wells Fargo 2010 Entrepreneur Excellence Award

Wells Fargo and the National Black MBA Association (NBMBAA) created the NBMBAA/Wells Fargo Entrepreneur Excellence Award to recognize and empower the visionaries that are a vital component of our community. Each year, two business owners are recognized for their exceptional vision, leadership, innovation and determination, receiving national recognition and a grant of $5,000.

For more information or to apply for the 2010 Award, please download the 2010 NBMBAA/Wells Fargo Entrepreneur Excellence Award Application (PDF) by visiting
http://www.nbmbaa.org/docs/2010_entrepreneurial_excellence.pdf.

To learn more about African American Business Services, contact aabs@wellsfargo.com,
or DIAL 1-800-35-WELLS (1-800-359-3557).

Grants support business districts

Minneapolis this week approved $578,175 in grants to business districts through the City’s Great Streets neighborhood business district program. The grants will assist business districts throughout the city with technical assistance such as branding and marketing, merchandising, business recruitment, and design services.
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Understanding Medicare a complicated process


Most people are somewhat familiar with Medicare, since it's likely they or a family member are already covered by the government-provided health insurance program. But with its alphabet soup of options and complex rules, Medicare can be daunting to the uninitiated.

If you're approaching 65, here are some Medicare basics you'll need to know:

Medicare provides benefits to people age 65 and older and those under 65 with certain disabilities or end-stage renal disease. Most people's initial enrollment period is the seven months beginning three months before the month they turn 65. If you miss that window, you may enroll between January 1 and March 31 each year, with coverage beginning July 1.
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US Census takers start visiting households

The U.S. Census Bureau began "Non-Responsive Follow-Up" Operations on May 1st with the 28% of households in the U.S. who did not return their questionnaire by mail.  Census takers will visit a household several times in an effort to get the basic information on the ten questions on the 2010 Census.
When a census taker visits a home, he or she will try to collect the information by interviewing an adult member of the household. If a census taker cannot contact a household after repeated attempts, they will seek information in any way possible to estimate the number of people living in the home.

Dennis R. Johnson, Regional Director of the U.S. Census Bureau, stated, “I encourage the public to cooperate with census takers when they are working in your neighborhood. The 2010 Census is not yet completed and this work is vital to our efforts to get a complete and accurate count of everyone living in your community.”
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Work life boundaries: Nothing is personal

Work life boundaries: Nothing is personalDuring busy season, Karen’s company keeps cots in a closet so employees can catch a nap while working all night on projects.  Lea’s best friends are the people she works with.  She doesn’t have time to forge friendships anywhere else.  Spending forty or fifty hours a week with a group of people for months or years at a time, it seems natural that you would become friends, or even like family, after a while.  But when is “close” too close?  Where is the line between personal and professional, when you work alongside the same people day in and day out?

Religion and politics have long been taboo in the workplace.  Yet, these topics are difficult to steer clear of because they often play a part in the news and TV shows we want to discuss, and because passion for a topic can override good judgement.  Use your own expectations to test whether to step into or walk away from a conversation.  Inviting your co-workers to a concert at your church might be acceptable; expecting them to meditate with you in the break room is not.  When others cross that line, have a comment ready to use to excuse yourself.  It can be simple, “I’d better get back to work.”  Say it politely, and then reinforce that boundary by walking away. 
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