Insight News

Thursday
Sep 18th

Commentary

After the March on Washington

The 1963 March on Washington was a pivotal moment for African Americans, a day when people joined to fight for jobs, peace and justice. More than 250,000 people traveled to Washington, coming by busses, trains, and occasionally planes. They came despite the scourge of segregation, which meant that many who were driving had to carefully select the places they could stop and eat (actually most brought goodies from home) or relieve themselves. Despite obstacles, a quarter of a million people showed up in Washington, gathering peacefully and with dignity. As a result of the March, the Civil Rights Act was passed in 1964, and the Voting Rights Act in 1965 was passed with more than three-quarters of the House and Senate supporting both Acts.
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Invisible children

Invisible children"I would say that, well, obviously my high school didn't prepare me for college."
--Darryl Briggs, youth leader and college student
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Jackie Jackson: A mother's love

Jackie Jackson: A mother's loveOn Wednesday, Aug. 14, Congressman Jesse Jackson, Jr. was scheduled to be sentenced to prison in connection with using campaign funds for personal use. Dozens of letters were sent to the judge on his behalf, but none more touching than the one written by his mother, dated May 28.
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Dropping the leadership baton

Dropping the leadership batonResearch shows that this generation of young people, no matter of their race, are likely to do less well than their parents did. Shackled by a trillion dollars worth of student loans and a flat labor market, the New York-based Demos organization says the student loan burden prevents young people from buying homes and amassing wealth. While there are some racial gaps, many young people enter the labor market already behind the space their parents occupied.
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'Stop and Frisk': Unconstitutional racial profiling

'Stop and Frisk': Unconstitutional racial profiling"No one should live in fear of being stopped whenever he leaves his home to go about the activities of daily life."

Those words came from U.S. District Court Judge Shira Scheindlin in her fiery 195-page ruling on the NYPD's "stop-and-frisk" program. After a two-month trial featuring dozens of interviews and statistical analysis of nearly five million police stops, Judge Scheindlin concluded what so many already knew: New York City's stop-and-frisk is an unconstitutional racial profiling program.
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AL-KHALIL (HEBRON) REFLECTION: A better than usual Friday (8 August 2013)

AL-KHALIL (HEBRON) REFLECTION: A better than usual Friday  (8 August 2013)CPTnet
12 August 2013
[Note: The following story has been edited for length. The entire reflection may be found in the new CPT Palestine newsletter.]
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Teddy bears, toy guns, and real guns

Teddy bears, toy guns, and real gunsImagine your kindergartner is visiting a new friend's house. During the hour they are running around together they'll pick up and play with all three of the following things, but only two of them have been tested by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) for safety standards. Which one do you want to be sure has been regulated for safety?
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