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Tuesday
Jul 29th

Fusing two culture takes real hard work

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Two cultures. Two languages. Two worlds apart. Cultural fusion is something America knows all too well. But, for the rest of the world, it takes work.
Two cultures. Two languages. Two worlds apart. Cultural fusion is something America knows all too well. But, for the rest of the world, it takes work.

Intercambios, a program to help foreign students improve their spanish by interacting with spanish-speaking students tries to bridge those gaps.

After two full months in spain, I still wake up waiting to discover something new about the culture and the people. My participation in intercambios is another way to enhance my complete emergence in Spainish culture.

There are five participants in the program that helps us learn about each others’ cultures. It is refreshing to see the group of diverse students uniting to dismiss preconceived notions about each other’s culture. One of the notions I had before my encounters with the program participants was I would be disliked as an american. Paula Messina, director of the American Institute for Foreign Study-Granada, led me to this conclusion. According to her 14 yrs of observation, american students are not always well received in spain but I chose to draw my own conclusions. I decided that I would not accept that stereotype and I am glad I did.

I have found that maintaing an open mind can be very rewarding. The students have allowed me to feel more welcomed into the country and their actions have countered most of which I have heard about the downfalls of being an american in a foreign country, in my case, Spain.
 

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