Insight News

Friday
Sep 04th

Health

Making a visit to the doctor without leaving home

WASHINGTON (NNPA) – Sometimes you can’t make it to the doctor. You don’t have a way to get there, you’re bedridden, or you may have simply forgotten. Cueing up a Skype session with your physician might be the most efficacious solution to getting immediate care, avoiding a missed appointment (and $40 co-pay), and to skipping the marathon waiting room sessions and  flipping through out dated issuemagazines.

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Agencies enhance security for prescription medications

Hospitals, health care providers, state government and law enforcement have joined together to create a set of best practices that hospitals and health care facilities can use to enhance security for controlled substances, including narcotics and other powerful prescription medications.

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Cancer fact or fiction: Separating myths from good information

Cancer fact or fiction: Separating myths from good information

To many, cancer remains one of the most frightening diagnoses in modern medicine. But much of this fear is a result of myths that have circulated for years in spite of the good information that is available. Indeed, many of cancer's mysteries have been solved, and a great deal of success has been achieved in curing patients and helping them live longer and better lives. In spite of advances in cancer treatment and prognosis, many continue to believe in myths surrounding cancer.  In particular, studies have shown that African Americans are more likely than whites to maintain some erroneous beliefs about cancer.

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Understanding healing and domestic abuse

Understanding healing and domestic abuse

Emotional verbal abuse in marriage is commonplace in couples of all walks of life. Sometimes it's an innocent reflexive gesture that comes out unconsciously. And other times, it's an oral blow intended to smack you across your heart and soul.

The question is what do you do in the moment it comes your way? And then, as a result of this, what follows?

Swallowing emotional and verbal abuse

Spousal abuse survivors become accustomed to swallowing emotional and verbal abuse as though it was part of their daily bread. They come to see it simply as "what he does."

They know that if they challenge it, there will be more. So, they quietly hold their own...chewing...stewing...digesting the indigestible.

Then the day comes when they say to themselves, "That's it, no more!" But this doesn't stop his being emotionally and verbally abusive.

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Chantel SinGs: Spreading awareness through music

Chantel SinGs: Spreading awareness through music

A mother, singer/songwriter, actress, and radio show host, Chantel SinGs is a woman of many talents.

She is also a survivor of ovarian cancer.

Born in Chicago, SinGs used music as a tool to endure hardship.  “I’ve always been a singing bird since a little girl.” she said.

“We didn’t grow up with much,” SinGs recalls.  “Sometimes the lights were cut off and all we had was a radio, batteries and cassette tapes.  I would rock in the dark and I would sing and dance front and center.”

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Postal Service tests ability to deliver medication in a public health emergency

On Sunday, May 6, U.S. Postal Service volunteers will make an unusual delivery in selected Twin Cities neighborhoods: An empty pill bottle at each residential mailing address. In the west metro, all residential addresses in ZIP codes 55411 and 55422 will be a part of the exercise, so people in parts of north Minneapolis, Crystal, Golden Valley, and Robbinsdale will receive the delivery. People who receive the pill bottle do not need to do anything—just recycle the bottle.

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Black women have twice the odds of infertility

PRNewswire/ -- Infertility affects one in eight couples or 7.3 million people in the U.S.  12% of women of reproductive age experience difficulty having a baby and Black women have twice the odds of infertility compared to white women.  11.5% of Black women report infertility compared to 7% of white women but yet studies indicate that Black women use infertility services less often.  Why?  "In the past, there was a lack of attention toward the problem of infertility in minority women, and most marketing campaigns of infertility awareness and treatment were not directed towards us.  This resulted in a lack of awareness about infertility as a disease and about avenues for seeking evaluation and treatment," says Dr. Desiree McCarthy-Keith, the newest reproductive endocrinologist to join Georgia Reproductive Specialists.  "Cost of infertility services can be prohibitive to couples from all ethnic backgrounds and cost may be a factor for some Black women as well," she continues.  "I believe lack of access to infertility care and limited awareness about evaluation and treatment options can also be substantial obstacles that keep many women from receiving the care that they need."

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