Insight News

Saturday
Jul 04th

Health

AARP recognizes Delores Wade for commitment to community service

AARP recognizes Delores Wade for commitment to community service

Delores Wade of Minneapolis received the AARP Andrus Award for Community Service, the Association’s most prestigious volunteer award at a recognition luncheon last week at Sabathani Community Center in Minneapolis.  The AARP Andrus Award for Community Service recognizes members and volunteers who, through volunteer service, are enhancing members’ lives in the areas of health and wellness, economic security and work, life transition issues, and personal enrichment. 

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Solutions to end the drug shortage crisis

 

Axel Zirbes is a cute four-year-old boy with bright eyes and a big smile.  He also happens to have no hair on his head.  That’s because Axel is being treated for leukemia.

When he was scheduled to start chemotherapy earlier this year, Axel’s parents learned that an essential drug, cytarabine, was in short supply and might not be available for their son.

Understandably, they were thrown into a panic and desperately looked for any available alternatives.  They even prepared to take Axel to Canada, where cytarabine is still readily available. 

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A new health care system for Hennepin County


ISAIAH, a 501(c)3 non-profit coalition of over 100 congregations across the state, is praising Hennepin County’s ‘Health Care Delivery Systems Demonstration Project’ that will be submitted to the Minnesota Department of Human Services in early 2012.

The county-wide integrated health care delivery network is part of the federal Affordable Care Act of 2011, which allows for the creation of new health delivery systems. New programs must provide cost savings for the reinvestment in preventive health measures and lower the cost of providing care and services. The proposed patient-centered model of care will serve approximately 10,000 at-risk Medicaid beneficiaries in Hennepin County and is expected to greatly improve community health outcomes. People covered by Medicaid, 68% of which are of color, are living in deep poverty and are among the most vulnerable populations in the state.  They often receive no preventive care and are frequent users of emergency room care, which results in poor health outcomes at a high cost to both the individual and the community.

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Solutions to end the drug shortage crisis

Axel Zirbes is a cute four-year-old boy with bright eyes and a big smile.  He also happens to have no hair on his head.  That’s because Axel is being treated for leukemia.

When he was scheduled to start chemotherapy earlier this year, Axel’s parents learned that an essential drug, cytarabine, was in short supply and might not be available for their son.

Understandably, they were thrown into a panic and desperately looked for any available alternatives.  They even prepared to take Axel to Canada, where cytarabine is still readily available. 

Read more...

American Cancer Society offers information and support during holidays

The holidays are a time when we gather with friends and loved ones, celebrating the season and counting our blessings. For those dealing with cancer, this time of year can be filled with treatment sessions, doctor appointments and worry.

Throughout the holidays, in fact all year long, the American Cancer Society offers free information and support to help cancer patients, caregivers and the public stay well and get well.

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Negro, please!

Last month I placed an application with the Secretary of the State’s office to participate on one of the state boards.  After receiving the notice about the board vacancy, I was very excited about being able to volunteer to serve and as soon as I got home I began to complete the applications. The form was like most applications and solicited information about my contact information as well as my qualifications to serve.  Also on the form was basic information asking about my political affiliation, which district I would represent, if selected and my race/ethnicity. That was when the proverbial stuff hit the fan.  As I began to complete the demographics section, I noticed that my choices were listed as follows:  “African American/Black/Negro.”  That’s right, NEGRO!  I could not believe it.  I was put out that I called and left emails with the Secretary of State’s office.  Their explanation was that the U.S. Census Bureau still referred to Black folks as “Negros” and that is why we will stay listed as “Negros” in Minnesota.

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Popular chain-smoking TV characters represent progress in smoking cessation efforts

Americans love to revisit history, whether it is inside the doors of a museum, on the pages of a history book, or on television.  This includes the millions of us who love watching Enoch “Nucky” Thompson on Boardwalk Empire, which is set during Prohibition, as well as Mad Men’s Don Draper and his coworkers at Sterling Cooper Advertising in the 1960s. 

Comparing their lifestyles to today’s norms is just as interesting as analyzing the characters themselves.  For instance, the United States has spent decades trying to get people to stop smoking and, more recently, protecting people from secondhand smoke exposure.  Slowly but surely, smoking has become less acceptable, and today’s norm is that smoking is not allowed in public places such as workplaces, restaurants, bars, and many outdoor spaces.  It’s hard for most of us to imagine working in an office while someone next to us chain-smokes like Mad Men’s Don Draper. 

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