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Tuesday
Oct 21st

Healing for the masculine soul

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masculine soulIn my last article, I discussed healing for the black family. This week I would like to discuss healing from the male's perspective or healing for the masculine soul. Most men are born whole. They come into the world full of wonder and potential. Their souls and spirits are one, and they are at peace internally and externally. The male ego is very fragile, and it is connected to a man's masculinity through his emotions. It is protected by his thick skin. When the man is healthy and whole, his emotions are in check and his desires are under control.

As life goes on, the good in man is processed normally, but when something happens that wounds his ego, attacks his sexuality, or scars him emotionally, a tear is made in his masculine soul. His thick skin is no longer his protection, and his ego and emotions become vulnerable to attack. In some men, this attack took place before his clear memory was formed or at an age that caused his desires to be sidetracked. He is now sexually, emotionally, or spiritually derailed, and all his actions become driven by the desire to heal the tear in his soul. Drugs and alcohol may become his medicine. Our family and community are impacted by these deep wounds. All is not lost. There is hope and healing. Below are three steps to begin the healing of the masculine soul.

The first step in healing the masculine soul is the wounded man must admit that he is wounded. This can be challenging. When a man is scared at a young age emotionally, he only knows what he knows so his broken life may seem normal to him. He may view his vices and addictions as a part of his life's choices. To some degree that may be true, but if a man walks with a limp because he was dropped as a child, someone else impacted his life. He may need help in understanding the difference. A man can no more create a tear in his masculine soul than he can perform open heart surgery on himself. Because someone outside of him was involved in creating the tear, someone outside of him will be involved in the healing process as well.

The next step in healing the masculine soul is the wounded man must allow medicine to get to the wound. This may be very painful. Wounds have to be exposed to be treated properly. Sensitive nerve will become visible and inordinate affection will rise to the surface. Men who have spent a lifetime masking the shame associated with their emotional scars are now asked to uncover it for healing sake. Despite this reservation, exposure is needed for permanent healing to take place. As the saying goes, "We are only as sick as our secrets."

The final step in healing of the masculine soul is for the wounded to submit himself to the aftercare process. Emotional and spiritual wounds will have to be addressed and treated properly. No single therapy or counseling session will be sufficient. Men who are wounded need a safe, healthy environment to recover. This environment must be sterile and free from the vices that have once ruled their life. The wounded man will need to stay clear of any situation that has the potential to injure him again.

I believe that Only God can permanently heal the tear in the masculine soul. Qualified professionals will have their part, but God will do the heavy lifting. Through his Son, he has given us all access to permanent healing. "Surely he took up our pain and bore our suffering, yet we considered him punished by God, stricken by him, and afflicted. But he was pierced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities; the punishment that brought us peace was on him, and by his wounds we are healed" Isaiah 53:4-5.

Timothy Houston is an author, minister, and motivational speaker who is committed to guiding positive life changes in families and communities. To get copies of his books, for questions, comments or more information, go to www.tlhouston.com.
 

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