Insight News

Thursday
Jul 24th

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Proposed tobacco settlement excludes Black media

Proposed tobacco settlement excludes Black mediaWASHINGTON – The U.S. Justice Department and the Tobacco-Free Kids Action Fund have reached an agreement with the four major tobacco companies that requires them to spend more than $30 million advertising with the three major television networks and run full-page ads in 35 White and Hispanic newspapers as well as purchasing space on their respective websites but not make a single purchase from a Black print or broadcast media company.
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Floyd Henderson: Breaking barriers

Floyd Henderson: Breaking barriersNorthside resident and retired research librarian Floyd Henderson was inducted into Valparaiso University's Hall of Fame last year in February as the first African-American inductee.

Henderson made history for the first time when he gained the title of first African-American to participate in intercollegiate athletics at Valparaiso University in 1951. The barrier breaker said that he first heard about the Lutheran university from his hometown minister.
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The mission continues: New year brings new methods

The mission continues: New year brings new methodsThe essence of a new year is that it brings forth new opportunities and new possibilities for an organization to grow, change, and transform. January is the time when individuals as well as organizations reflect on lessons learned from the prior year, and use this wisdom for continuous improvement in the coming year.
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Is national media coverage of Cedar Riverside fire connected to scrutiny of Somali Americans?

Is national media coverage of Cedar Riverside fire connected to scrutiny of Somali Americans?I woke up Tuesday morning to Facebook posts from my Somali American friends expressing their sadness and confusion about the Cedar Riverside apartment fire that day. The fire left 14 injured, destroyed a halal market, and also partially damaged a nearby mosque. Many of my friends and acquaintances were in disbelief and shock at the news as the new year began.
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On day one: Mayor and majority of city council side with equity

On day one: Mayor and majority of city council side with equityOne hundred and fifty community members braved a record cold snap to demand the new Minneapolis City Council prioritize closing Minneapolis' worst-in-the-nation racial equity gaps as they begin their new terms.

By a 7 – 6 majority, the council supported a motion to allow community members impacted by the gaps to testify for 15 minutes before the council, however they did not meet the two-thirds threshold necessary to suspend the rules. At the conclusion of the inauguration ceremony for the new council, hundreds kicked off a rally for equity by singing "We Shall Not Be Moved" on the stairs of the rotunda as newly inaugurated Mayor Betsy Hodges sang along.
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Letter to the editor: Shannon Gibney

Letter to the editor: Shannon GibneyWhat an unsettling article about the MCTC, Minneapolis Community and Technical College, regarding its unfair and hypocritical treatment in rendering a threatening reprimand to the biracial English professor, Shannon Gibney, for addressing structural racism in the U.S. only because two (2) caucasian students in her class felt uncomfortable about the subject.
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Green line businesses in the red

Green line businesses in the redAlthough the mission is for the Green Line to connect communities and make travel more efficient, the construction process has severed customer traffic and left Arnellia's (like many businesses along the Central Corridor) in the red.
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Donna Brazile is MLK, Jr. speaker

Donna Brazile is MLK, Jr. speakerDonna Brazile, political commentator, strategist, author and adjunct professor, will deliver the keynote speech at the 24th annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Breakfast on Monday, Jan. 20, 2014. This event will be hosted by General Mills Foundation and United Negro College Fund (UNCF).
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U.S. winning war on poverty

U.S. winning war on povertyWASHINGTON (NNPA) – Nearly 50 years after President Lyndon B. Johnson declared war on poverty, a new report finds that robust social safety net programs are slowly leading the nation to victory.

According to the report, "Trends in Poverty With an Anchored Supplemental Poverty Measure," the poverty rate has dropped 40 percent since 1967, as a result of provisions such as housing vouchers, free school lunch unemployment benefits, Social Security, food stamps, and more. Without these programs, the researchers find, the percentage of Americans living in poverty would be twice as high.
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Dark factories

Dark factoriesDear EarthTalk: What are "dark factories" and are they good for the environment?
-- Mitchell Pearson, Erie, PA

So-called dark factories—otherwise known as "lights out" or "automatic" factories—are manufacturing facilities that do not depend on human labor to get work done. While they may have some benefits for the environment they are certainly not beneficial overall considering the impact widespread adoption would have on needed jobs.
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FACTS ON ETHNIC ELDERS: Study shows racial gap in pension, retirement savings

FACTS ON ETHNIC ELDERS: Study shows racial gap in pension, retirement savings"Facts on Ethnic Elders" is a monthly column on research findings about ethnic elders present and future. It is supported by a grant from The Atlantic Philanthropies.

"People of color face particularly severe challenges in preparing for retirement," states a new report titled, "Race and Retirement Insecurity in the United States," by the National Institute on Retirement Security (NIRS).
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    "Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art " at Walker Art Center... Valerie Cassel Oliver, curator; Fionn Meade, Walker coordinating curator; artist Jamal Cyrus and artist Maren Hassenger.

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