George Floyd Square

Public Works has been in close contact with community partners to determine two options for 38th & Chicago that preserve space for the memorial and art while ensuring delivery of critical services for the area, including much needed public transit.

The City of Minneapolis leadership has said its committed to working with the community to reconnect 38th & Chicago after the conclusion of the Derek Chauvin trial. City leadership’s overriding goals will be to support the needs of residents and businesses while honoring the importance of racial healing and reflection in this sacred space.

Prior to reconnection, the City will continue to work toward its long-term commitments advancing racial justice while providing enhanced core City services and engagement opportunities for residents and businesses in the 38th & Chicago area.

Highlights of enhanced City services, access and partnerships include:

  • The City’s Department of Community Planning and Economic Development (CPED) is doubling down on youth employment and training pathway opportunities by working alongside Summit Academy OIC, Project for Pride and Living and other potential partners on culturally specific, dedicated outreach and workforce development programs to help young people at the intersection pursue new career paths, including green workforce and technology sector jobs.
  • Public Works is providing enhanced services, including extra solid waste and recycling collection at the George Floyd memorial and installing temporary traffic calming measures, among other things.
  • The Minneapolis Police and Fire departments continue to respond to calls for service.
  • The Office of Violence Prevention and Neighborhood and Community Relations staff will work with community stakeholders on developing engagement and outreach activities for residents to promote public safety and healing.

Design options

Public Works has been in close contact with community partners to determine two options for 38th & Chicago that preserve space for the memorial and art while ensuring delivery of critical services for the area, including much needed public transit. Both options provide two-way traffic operations in all directions improving business and residential access and providing the opportunity to restore transit service on Chicago Avenue and 38th Street.

The City is sending a survey to area residents and businesses to determine the preferred option.

City’s long-term commitments

The City has pledged more than $10.5 million in funding that is eligible for supporting racial healing in the 38th & Chicago area, and has committed to several important initiatives to advance racial justice, including adopting a truth and reconciliation process with the ultimate objective of implementing specific solutions to specific harms that have created and perpetuate racial disparities.

38th & Chicago Option 1

City funding also includes $150,000 for the Creative City Making program to hire a diverse team of artists and healers to create, implement, and lead community engagement processes to guide the City’s community healing and rebuild with racial equity efforts for areas most impacted by civil unrest.

38th & Chicago Option 2

“The killing of George Floyd forever changed the intersection of 38th & Chicago and reshaped our city’s place in history. Those who live and work in the neighborhood did not ask for the global spotlight, yet they have graciously opened their doors to us and the world over the past nine months,” said Mayor Jacob Frey. “It is our responsibility as leaders and as a community to both honor George Floyd and the hallowed ground where he died, and also respectfully restore 38th & Chicago to a vibrant and functioning neighborhood.”

 “These measures are intended to maintain public safety as we continue to address the necessary goals for justice and healing from trauma,” said City Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins.

“Nine months of deep engagement with the multiple communities, businesses, and nonprofit leaders who call this area home has allowed us to understand that we can reconnect this area to access basic emergency services and vital public transit while honoring and uplifting the legacy of justice for the long term,” said City Council Member Alondra Cano.

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