Scholars and community members will participate in a University of Minnesota Urban Research and Outreach-Engagement Center (UROC) Critical Conversation on the hidden history of racial covenants in Minneapolis.

The discussion will center on new research showing what communities of color have known for decades – that structural barriers and legalized discrimination barred many people of color from buying property and building wealth for most of the last century. The program will be moderated by Neeraj Mehta, director of learning, McKnight Foundation, with panelists Mahmoud El-Kati, writer, lecturer, and commentator, Minneapolis City Councilman Jeremiah Ellison, Makeda Zulu-Gillespie, director of community outreach, UROC, Kirsten Delegard, project director, University of Minnesota Libraries’ Mapping Prejudice Project and Owen Duckworth, director of organizing and policy, The Alliance. It will also include a presentation by Mapping Prejudice Project co-founder and Digital and Geospatial Director Kevin Ehrman-Solberg.

The forum takes place Oct. 10 at UROC, 2001 Plymouth Ave. N., Minneapolis with a 5 p.m. reception and a 6 p.m. program. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is requested. Those interested in registering can do so online at www.z.umn.edu/CCMappingPrejudice.

Co-sponsored by the University of Minnesota Libraries’ Mapping Prejudice Project, the event is part of the Minnesota Housing Partnership’s Racism, Rent and Real Estate series and the University’s 1968-1969 to 2018-19 Historic Upheavals, Enduring Aftershocks symposium.

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