The 2004 presidential election is the most crucial change of cause in the history of Black America. It is about civil rights and constitutional rights. It is precisely a struggle to reconcile the two Americas of poverty and prosperity. The 2004 presidential election is the most crucial change of cause in the history of Black America. It is about civil rights and constitutional rights. It is precisely a struggle to reconcile the two Americas of poverty and prosperity. So, this election is about securing a united America of true freedom, equality and justice. The “Conversations with Al McFarlane Public Policy Forum” broadcast on KMOJ FM89.9, provides a platform for the community of color in the Twin Cities to participate fully in writing the next chapter of their lifetime.

“It is an important time for us to consider all the dimensions of this presidential election. One of them is the future of the United States Supreme Court. The next president is going to have the possible opportunity to name as many as three supreme court justices. If it is George Bush who gets to name those justices, what we will have are justices who are not as sympathetic to the decades of social progress that we made to end discrimination against minorities, to end discrimination against women, to end discrimination against workers, to end discrimination against people with disabilities, to end discrimination against people who are gay and lesbians,” explained Kate Michelman, former president of Pro-Choice America. She joined “Conversations with Al McFarlane Public Policy Forum” via telephone from Washington, D.C. The Public Policy forum was hosted by the Martin Luther King Center in St. Paul.

Michelman said George Bush will favor justices who will weaken the ability of the federal government to enforce laws that protect the environment, to enforce laws that protect women against violence, to enforce laws that protect people from discrimination. “There is a lot at stake. Our civil rights and our voting rights are obviously at stake,” said Michelman. While the election for presidency is for four years, she continued, “the impact of lifetime appointments to the Supreme Court and the federal court is for generations to come.

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